Sunday, 21 May 2017

Salford buildings that tell a story ........ part 3 Mrs Burke's beer shop on the corner of Bank and Encombe Place

It is amazing what little bits of history you come across when you just set off wandering across the twin cities.

Bank Place, 2014
This is the corner of Bank and Encombe Place and it is somewhere you could easily miss.

But if you did turn off Chapel Street and wander along the route that comes out at Upper Cleminson Street I doubt that you would be aware of its former history.

The road twists and turns and as it does actually changes its name five times, starting as St Paul’s Place, then turning left to become Bank Street then Wilton Place before briefly assuming the name Bank Place and finishing off as Encombe Place.

Bank Place, 1894
All of which is a clue to what we have lost because until relatively recently Bank Place continued from Wilton Place round the side of the church to join up with Bank Street with the church in the centre.

Today all of the ten houses which ran from Bank Street round to Encombe Place have gone.

Back in 1911 these were seven and roomed properties and home a mix of people from Joshua Ross who was a foreman and Daniel Roberts a printer to an office cleaner, clerk and carrier.

But it is the building in Andy’s picture that draws me in.  I don’t know when it stopped selling beer but I do know that in 1911 it was the beer shop of Mrs Josephine Burke who shared the six roomed house with her five children and one niece.

Mrs Burke and her neighbours, 1911
Mrs Burke was a widow and she had taken over the business from her husband on his death in 1907.

In time I will go looking for Mr Burke but for now I shall content myself with Josephine who had been married in 1882.  She had been just 21 gave her occupation as a sewing machinist and came from a comfortably off family.  Her father was a plumber employing four men.

Three of her own children were clerks and two helped behind the bar.

Hers was the only house on the west side of the street but her neighbours included the Rev Arthur Lyle who was the curate of St Philips, a Miss Hood who ran a “Free Kindergarten” along with a clerk plumber and caretaker.

Bank Place, 1849
Today there is little sense of what was once here, the buildings have gone and with them the small community that lived around the church.

Go back another fifty years and that life around St Philips is even more apparent.

All of which makes me think there is even more to find out about the people of Bank Place and its neighbouring streets

And just minutes after the story was re-posted Rick has written in to say that "the Borough Tavern,when I worked at Farmer Norton.On the corner of Upper Cleminson St and Adelphi St was the Brewery Tavern,so named after the Adelphi brewery Co.

Later the buildings were used by Wire drawing dies and Anglardia Ltd.".

Picture; Bank Place, 2014 from the collection of Andy Robertson, the same place in 1844 from the 1842-49 OS Manchester & Salford, and in  1894, from the OS for South Lancashire, 188-94 courtesy of Digital Archives Association, http://www.digitalarchives.co.uk/

2 comments:

  1. Mrs Burke was my Great Grandmother and she took over the pub when her husband, Thomas, died (he liked his own wares a little too much and every so often his wife had him taken to the coal boat to Ireland to Newry where her father's family originated) she took over. Thomas's own father, a baker, came from Dublin. And her oldest son, my Grandfather, was also called Thomas as would be his oldest son. Thomas senior had given his oldest son the money to go New York to see if he wanted to make his fortune there but he didn't like preferring Salford and came back and took over running the business. Grandfather was known as Tommy and the pub was called The Borough. Great Grandmother moved to a house in Encombe Place. By 1914 my Grandfather was married with two sons of his own but his brother Patrick Arthur went off to fight in the war surviving the Somme to die at Ypres - you will find his name on the Tyne Cot memorial. Patrick's letters home from the front are quoted in The Manchester Pals' were used in the BBC documentary on the Somme and as the basis for the commemorative programme on BBC Manchester Radio. The younger brother's total deafness meant he could not join up. My Grandfather also had five children: three boys and then two girls none of whom wanted to go into the pub trade. Tenancy of the pub then passed to the MItchells, relatives of my Great Grandmother but I'm not sure of the tenancy when it became The Dock and Pulpit (because it was behind St Philip's and adjoining the County Court you can see the back of the pub in Lowry's painting of the Court). Grandfather's children now all dead were all proud to be Salfordians. The extended family is now spread across the globe - I too lived for a while across an ocean but did return to live closer to home.

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  2. Mrs Burke was my Great Grandmother and she took over the pub when her husband, Thomas, died (he liked his own wares a little too much and every so often his wife had him taken to the coal boat to Ireland to Newry where her father's family originated) she took over. Thomas's own father, a baker, came from Dublin. And her oldest son, my Grandfather, was also called Thomas as would be his oldest son. Thomas senior had given his oldest son the money to go New York to see if he wanted to make his fortune there but he didn't like preferring Salford and came back and took over running the business. Grandfather was known as Tommy and the pub was called The Borough. Great Grandmother moved to a house in Encombe Place. By 1914 my Grandfather was married with two sons of his own but his brother Patrick Arthur went off to fight in the war surviving the Somme to die at Ypres - you will find his name on the Tyne Cot memorial. Patrick's letters home from the front are quoted in The Manchester Pals' were used in the BBC documentary on the Somme and as the basis for the commemorative programme on BBC Manchester Radio. The younger brother's total deafness meant he could not join up. My Grandfather also had five children: three boys and then two girls none of whom wanted to go into the pub trade. Tenancy of the pub then passed to the MItchells, relatives of my Great Grandmother but I'm not sure of the tenancy when it became The Dock and Pulpit (because it was behind St Philip's and adjoining the County Court you can see the back of the pub in Lowry's painting of the Court). Grandfather's children now all dead were all proud to be Salfordians. The extended family is now spread across the globe - I too lived for a while across an ocean but did return to live closer to home.

    ReplyDelete