Thursday, 21 July 2016

How long before the Tatton Arms becomes a memory?

It has been a landmark on this bit of the Mersey for a very long time.

But it closed in 2007 and as the phrase goes has “an uncertain future.”

And I have got to say that Andy has caught its slow decline very well, standing behind that wire fencing.

Like its neighbour just a little west it once had a lucrative trade in ferrying people across the Mersey, and when the bridge was built thirsty travellers had to pay a toll.

I don’t jnow when the toll was abolished but I am guessing it will be at the same as the charge on the bridge by Jackson’s Boat which was in the 1940s.

That said as later as the 1830s when Jackson’s Boat was the Greyhound the publican still had the right to charge people to ferry them across the river.

And that was despite the fact that the old wooden bridge erected in 1818 by Sam Wilton was offering a safer alternative.

Still his bridge may have gone when the new one was erected in the 1880s, but the “Boat” still offers up a pint while the Tatton Arms is now dry.

Location; Northenden

Picture; the Tatton Arms, 2016 from the collection of Andy Robertson

No comments:

Post a Comment